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Students Coaching Students - examples

The studies include reciprocal coaching where peers coach one another, and non-reciprocal coaching, for example where an older student coaches a younger student.

  • Short et al. (2010) describe a reciprocal peer coaching study where university undergraduates coached one another before an examination period, after being trained in the key principles and models of coaching. The students experienced a greater reduction in stress than those in the control group.
    Short, E., Kinman, G. & Baker, S. (2010). Evaluating the impact of a peer coaching intervention on well-being amongst psychology undergraduate students. International Coaching Psychology Review, 5(1), 27–35.
  • Stelter et al. (2011) describe narrative-collaborative group coaching where young sports talents engage in group dialogue for meaning-making. Results show a significant increase in the level of social recovery and an effect on general wellbeing.
    Stelter, R., Nielsen, G. & Wikman, J. (2011). Narrative-collaborative group coaching develops social capital – a randomised control trial and further implications of the social impact of the intervention. Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 42(2), 123–137.Stelter, R., Nielsen, G. & Wikman, J. (2011). Narrative-collaborative group coaching develops social capital – a randomised control trial and further implications of the social impact of the intervention. Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 42(2), 123–137.
  • Coaching is also being used in primary or elementary schools (Briggs & van Nieuwerburgh, 2012). Primary-aged children can learn to give and receive feedback, a key skill in encouraging the coaching skill of reflection.
    Briggs, M. & van Nieuwerburgh, C. (2012). Coaching in primary or elementary schools. In C. van Nieuwerburgh (Ed.), Coaching in education: Getting better results for students, educators and parents (pp. 47–61). London: Karnac
  • Briggs and van Nieuwerburgh (2010) found that primary school aged children in years 5 and 6 (9–11 year olds) could learn peer coaching skills and could give and receive feedback.
    Briggs, M. & van Nieuwerburgh, C. (2010). The development of peer coaching skills in primary school children in years 5 and 6. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 9, 1415–1422.
  • When the study was repeated in another primary school (Dorrington & van Nieuwerburgh, 2015) the children spoke about the factors that made them more likely to accept feedback, including the need to feel valued by the person giving feedback.
    Dorrington, L. & van Nieuwerburgh, C. (2015). The development of peer coaching skills in primary school children: An exploration of how children respond to feedback. International Journal of Information and Education Technology, 5(1), 50–54.
  • Peer coaching has increased the incidence of positive behaviour in social settings in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In Plumer and Stoner’s (2005) study set in the USA, children with ADHD who had difficulty with peer social relationships took part in a peer tutoring programme to improve their spelling. During the peer tutoring programme the children were actively and positive engaged with their peers in the classroom only, but not in the playground. However, improved peer relationships were observed in social settings during recess and lunch when the programme was complemented by peer coaching to remind the children of their goals and give feedback.
    Plumer, P. J. & Stoner, G. (2005). The relative effects of classroom peer tutoring and peer coaching on the positive social behaviours of children with ADHD. Journal of Attention Disorders, 9(1), 290–300.
  • Several studies help us learn more about the benefits of educational coaching for the student coach. First example, Year 12 students who coached Year 11 students after being trained in coaching skills and GROW by the school’s educational psychologist, reported that the experience had developed their skills in communication, problem-solving and independent learning, and had improved their confidence in their ability to think and find solutions (van Nieuwerburgh et al., 2012).
    van Nieuwerburgh, C., Zacharia, C., Luckham, E., Prebble, G. & Browne, L. (2012). Coaching students in a secondary school: A case study. In C. van Nieuwerburgh (Ed.) Coaching in education: Getting better results for students, educators, and parents. London: Karnac.
  • Second example about the benefits of educational coaching for the student coach - (van Nieuwerburgh & Tong, 2013). A-Level students were trained in behavioural coaching techniques, cognitive behavioural techniques and GROW by an occupational psychologist and an educational coach. After coaching GCSE-level students, the student coaches reported improvements in their own study skills, self-confidence, communication skills, relationships and emotional intelligence.
    o van Nieuwerburgh, C. & Tong, C. (2013). Exploring the benefits of being a student coach in educational settings: a mixed-method study. Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Practice and Research, 6(1), 5–24.

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